Different Types of Punches You Can Use in Boxing

Your boxing gloves, hand wraps, heavy and speed bags are ready. Before you envision yourself as the next boxing legend, you need to practice first. 

Know that you have to learn the techniques first on how to throw the elemental punches. You have to make sure that you know how to execute it in a way that you don't injure yourself in the process. The following are different types of punches you can use in boxing.

Jab

From a defensive position, the lead hand is thrown quickly and straightforwardly. This punch is also coupled with the torso moving in a clockwise rotation.

While doing the jab, the rear side will usually remain in the guard position. Soon after the boxer made contact, his lead hand will immediately be pulled back into a guard position.

A jab is one of the most popular types of punches being used by boxers. It deprives the opponent of his much-needed room to perform a counter punch. However, a jab can sometimes have a weak impact.

This is why some boxers throw it with the aim of measuring the distance. Sometimes a jab is also used to test how well the opponent defends. A jab is also an effective punch for distracting the opponent thereby paving the way for more powerful punches.

Read Also: How to Acquire Technical Skills in Boxing

Other boxers have also learned how to throw solid jabs. Some fighters do this punch with an added half-step to ensure a more forceful jab.

Jabs are best thrown when an opponent is off guard. But, many neophyte boxers make the mistake of loading up their biceps quickly before throwing a jab. This loading up of muscles will be very conspicuous to your observant opponent.

Thus, increasing the likelihood of your jab failing to hit its target. Don't let your pectoral muscle twitch so suddenly that will make it too easy for your opponent to use. Instead, practice keeping your muscles or your biceps loaded all throughout the fight.

This way, you can throw a powerful jab or any punch any time and increase your chances of catching your opponent off guard.

With these different purposes of throwing a jab, such punch is classified into seven types. These are the regular jab, space-maker, double jab, counter jab, body jab, tapper and power jab.

Cross

If you are going to throw a straight punch using your rear hand, then that is what we call as "cross."

From a guard position, you cross your body and then hit your opponent in a straight line.

Once you throw forward your rear hand, retract your lead hand into a guard position to ensure your opponent won't be able to throw a counter punch.

 You may choose to rotate your torso in a counterclockwise manner for a more forceful cross.

man cross punching

If you are going to throw a straight punch using your rear hand, then that is what we call as "cross." From a guard position, you cross your body and then hit your opponent in a straight line.

Once you throw forward your rear hand, retract your lead hand into a guard position to ensure your opponent won't be able to throw a counter punch. You may choose to rotate your torso in a counterclockwise manner for a more forceful cross.

Make sure as well to move the weight of your foot from your lead and then to your rear foot. The presence of weight transfer and rotation combo makes this punch so powerful. You can even add a half-step if you want to give this punch more strength.

Don't forget to quickly retract your hand to a guard position once you have made contact. Most of the time, across is being thrown as a response to a jab.

But, it can also be thrown right after a jab, to create that classic "one-two" combo. Sometimes it is used to be able to set the hook. Therefore, you can use it as a counterpunch, lead punch or within a combo.

Don't make the mistake of extending your back leg while getting up on your toes. A lot of beginners do this because they feel like they have to reach forward when throwing across to ensure they hit the opponent.

Unfortunately, doing these will only leave you very open. Use your legs to brace the punch. Stay grounded and just pivot your back foot as if you're intentionally grinding a cigarette butt.

This will help ensure that you keep your balance while being able to throw a more powerful cross.

Hook

A hook is when you throw your lead hand in a semi-circular manner. A hook is usually aimed at hitting the side of the opponent's head. Draw your elbow horizontally to your fist while rotating in a clockwise rotation of the torso.  

The aim is to hit your enemy in a clockwise arc from the side. Your rear hand should remain in the guard position.

You can also throw a hook if you want to hit the side of your opponent's body- which is sometimes referred to as a "rip." A catch can be such a powerful punch that once thrown can most likely knock out the opponent.

 

Uppercut

woman practicing uppercut

An uppercut is capable of causing excruciating damage to your opponent's chin. It is essential that once you throw this punch, your legs are in proper position.  This kind of blow is best thrown when your opponent is just within close range.

An uppercut is thrown vertically using the rear hand from a guard position. Simultaneously, your torso must also shift to your right while you bend your knees to ensure you will be able to hit the chin of your opponent.

So, as your torso shifts to the right and your knees slightly bent, it will be easier for you to throw an upward punch that will land on your opponent's chin. But, as you throw your punch, your knees must also be pushed upwards.

This will be coupled with your torso rotating counter-clockwise. An uppercut can lead your opponent to be out of balance. It will give you plenty of room to throw more lethal punches.

If you are working out at the comforts of your own home, remember the proper forms. Learning the correct boxing stance and footwork are also equally important.

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